Greenpoint Townhouse

Townhouse

This project was a renovation of a wood frame house built in 1866, located in an Historic District.  It is a unique house in that it is free-standing, located on a corner block, giving it natural light on 3 sides.  The design was a combination of selective floor plan changes to bring in even more light and to let the house “breathe” – replicating original trim – while using modern cabinetry for all new work.  The bathroom in particular was a very successful example of my personal desire to make bathrooms feel like furnished rooms – with fixtures as furniture.  (This was my own home)

This is the original entry door, restored. Prior to the renovation the sidelights and transom were concealed behind aluminum siding.

Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama. Interiors by Deborah Hancock, partner at Rees Roberts + Partners

AFTER
Removing the wall from the former photo fills the space with light and creates a Gallery for art.

Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama

To add drama and celebrate the original stair as a sculptural element, the existing simple door was enlarged to frame the stair.

Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama. Interiors by Deborah Hancock, partner at Rees Roberts + Partners

Even when not part of the architecture, playing with scale and form are important elements in creating a home.

Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama. Interiors by Deborah Hancock, partner at Rees Roberts + Partners
Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama. Interiors by Deborah Hancock, partner at Rees Roberts + Partners

View from Dining Room toward stair hall. The arch was replaced with a rectangular opening matching the one in the Living Room, framing art in the Gallery Entry Hall.

Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama. Interiors by Deborah Hancock, partner at Rees Roberts + Partners

I feel it is important to respect the essence of old homes. Instead of installing upper cabinets tight to every corner, the cabinets here evoke “cupboards” of old and are made of custom cerused oak. Since the kitchen is in an extension to the house and not open to the living space, a bench was incorporated for others to be in the kitchen while someone is cooking.

Photo by Makiko Kikuyama
Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama. Interiors by Deborah Hancock, partner at Rees Roberts + Partners

The Guest Room is located in a small space, so it was designed to be warm and cozy, with grass cloth wall covering and custom headboard and wall mounted night stands.

Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama. Interiors by Deborah Hancock, partner at Rees Roberts + Partners

The Master Bathroom is an example of one approach to bathroom design by our firm – where the fixtures are treated as furniture within a room. A key element of that is making the shower – typically the largest visual element in the room – nearly disappear. Special construction techniques and materials allow a painted wall surface and trim to be waterproof.

Photo by Mikiko Kikuyama